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Wales Drug and Alcohol Helpline

Freephone: 0808 808 2234
Or text DAN to: 81066
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If you don't find what you're looking for you can always ring the DAN 24/7 helpline on 0808 808 2234 and talk confidentially to an advisor.

What does Naloxone look like?

Clear Liquid.


Scientific Names

Naloxone Hydrochloride

Generic Name


How Is Naloxone Taken?

Naloxone may be given by injection into a vein, muscle or under the skin, or via a drip into a vein (intravenous infusion).

Medical uses of Naloxone

Naloxone is specifically used to counteract life-threatening depression of the central nervous system and respiratory system. It is not to be confused with Naltrexone, an Opioid receptor antagonist, used for Dependence treatment rather than emergency Overdose treatment.

Legal status of Naloxone

Prescription Only Medicine.

How does Naloxone work?

Naloxone is an opiate antagonist - it blocks the actions of Opiates and is routinely used during emergency resuscitation after opiate Overdose.

Effects Of Naloxone


Nausea and vomiting, sweating, increased heart rate, Hyperventilation, increased blood pressure, reversal of pain relief if larger than necessary doses are given, irregular heart beat, low blood pressure.

Where does it come from?

Naloxone is derived from Thebaine. Thebaine (paraMorphine) is a naturally occurring chemical of Opium, but has stimulatory rather than Depressant effects.

Helping services

Most areas of the UK have 'street agencies' or projects (sometimes called community drug services or community drug teams) which offer a range of services including information and advice, counselling, and sometimes support groups and complementary therapies such as acupuncture. Some services have extended working hours and may offer weekend support. If use of this substance becomes a problem you can seek help, advice and counselling from a service in your area. GPs can make referrals to specialist drug services. For a description of what the different drug services do, choose helping services from here or the main menu.

Parents & other relatives

Drug agencies also provide lots of advice and support to parents of people using these drugs. Many street agencies can provide relative support groups or counselling for family members, partners etc.

You can view a list of National Drug Agencies.

If you would like to talk about Naloxone problems then please call the DAN 24/7 Helpline on:

0808 808 2234
Last updated: 31 December 2012
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